Monthly Archives: November 2017

Engineering Dreams And Passion

It all started in my kindergarten class when my teacher and my mom recognized my need for tutoring in my math class. I was a slow learner as a child but I always applied myself and tried my best. It was the dedication of both my teacher and my mom that set me straight and helped me in developing my mathematical skills and reinforced my desire to learn. As a result I gained an appreciation and a love of the math and sciences.

I was always interested in learning how things worked and l also enjoyed working through and completely understanding my math assignments with the help and encouragement of my mom. As I learned and progressed with mathematics I started to gain confidence and actually enjoyed learning and looked forward to the challenges of the assignments. My dad was a very dedicated ironworker and he shared many stories of his experiences working in construction and he showed me many pictures through the years working on the high iron. As a result I had a desire to learn about bridge building and the construction of highways, roadways, tunnels, ball parks, buildings, homes, automobiles, rockets and electronic devices.

For a child growing up in the 1960’s I was influenced a great deal by the space program and I found it very exciting watching coverage of the Gemini and Apollo space missions. I was just a baby when President John F. Kennedy made his famous speech about landing a man on the moon’s surface before the end of the decade. Great strides had been made from that day onward evidenced by the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo space programs. I was too young for both the Mercury and Gemini programs but I have pretty vivid memories of the Apollo space program. I remember the tragedy of the Apollo I launch pad fire occurring during a simulation that claimed the lives of 3 astronauts Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee in January 1967. This was a very sad start to the program but NASA was determined to move on and accomplish what president John F. Kennedy had envisioned and expressed so eloquently in his speech.

The Apollo 11 mission was the one that stands out most in my mind because that was when we saw on July 20, 1969 Neil Armstrong take his first steps on the moon’s lunar surface and say the famous words, “That’s one small step for man and one giant leap for mankind.”

As a kid I was impressed with NASA and the astronauts training program and the educational backgrounds of all the astronauts. Most of them had studied engineering, mathematics, physics and chemistry in college and all of them were extremely well disciplined as a result of their military experience in the service of their country. They also were very dedicated to their training regiment upon acceptance into NASA’s astronaut program.

I thought mission control was an amazing grouping of engineers, scientists and some of the best minds in the country and world. When Apollo 13 had encountered difficulties that put the lives of the crew members in danger in their return mission home it was the dedicated and joint effort of mission control to help simulate the potential problems and come up with solutions so they could properly advise the astronauts in their safe return home. That after-all is what an engineer is trained to do.

Engineering is all about precision, technological innovation, problem solving and finding solutions. It is a very challenging curriculum in school and demands a great deal of focus, concentration and dedication. Some students are naturally inclined in learning the principals and theories and others have to really apply themselves and study all the time. I fell into this category as a student where I had to apply myself and I worked hard at it and was determined to do my best. My favorite subject throughout my studies in school was mathematics which is a powerful and very interesting course of study. The whole basis for engineering is the study of math and science principals.

I am inclined to think that engineers have a different mindset in that they are real problem solvers and like to understand and evaluate the inner workings of something and make the appropriate decisions that require a great deal of analysis based on scientific and mathematical theories. I have always found that engineers who study fatigue, stress failure or the aftermath of a plane crash and piece the evidence together to find a viable explanation whether it be aircraft parts scattered at crash sites or a part of a bridge that collapsed due to fatigue and stress failure truly incredible. They use what they learn in a classroom and apply it to the outside world and the situations that require their expertise and knowledge.

After every airline crash it is a mandatory practice to gather the pieces of the aircraft, the black box and any other relevant evidence and painstakingly reconstruct the airliner in a hanger as best they can with what they recover to determine the reason or potential reason for the crash. Somethings you just don’t learn in a textbook as their is no substitute then the real thing.

In the automotive industry their are all sorts of testing for driver and passenger safety and simulated collisions with varying speeds are always being performed to make safer cars to ensure the continued safety of drivers and their passengers. Engineers are always looking to design sleek cars that are fuel efficient and safe. These are the criteria they establish in the design stage of an automobile.

When I drive near an airport with my son and we see large aircraft passing over us it is really quite amazing to see. I always point this out to my son enthusiastically and remind him how truly incredible it is to see such large planes flying and remind him that they were all designed by engineers.

There are many fields of study I would suggest to young students and one in particular would be engineering. Within engineering there are so many specialties to consider. The main fields or endeavors that are engineering related are:

Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer and Software Engineering, Civil Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Automotive Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, Ocean and Environmental Engineering, Mining and Materials Engineering and Biomedical Engineering.

All students are required to take a core of engineering, mathematical and science related courses in their first two years of study with a core of English, arts and humanities as well that typically include:

Calculus I, II and III (Differential, Integral, Multi-variable), Linear Algebra; Physics (Heat and Sound, Electricity and Magnetism, Principals of Modern Physics; Chemistry I (Inorganic), Chemistry II (Inorganic); Statics and Strength of Materials; Engineering Dynamics; Engineering Circuit Analysis I & II; Engineering Thermodynamics; Computer Science I & II; English Literature, English Composition; Micro Economics, Macro Economics; Principals of Accounting I & II and Engineering Electives.

An Engineering curriculum is a well balanced program that includes Math, Science,Technical and the Arts and Sciences. It is a challenging course of study and a very interesting and exciting endeavor and the student has the flexibility of studying at a 2 year college and transferring to a 4 year institution.

There are many fine institutions for Engineering studies and the most prestigious would likely be the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. My preference is Virginia Tech having studied there and enjoying my time as an undergraduate engineering transfer student.

Raising a son with asperger’s I find my son has amazing aptitude and has a love of math and science which I think is wonderful. I will always encourage him to learn and challenge himself and to continue his interest in the math and sciences. I also believe that many asperger kids gravitate to the math and sciences and eventually continue their love of it by pursuing engineering as a field of interest. It is well documented that many engineers display common patterns and traits associated with asperger’s and many diagnosed individuals on the autistic spectrum are engineers, mathematicians, scientists, writers and teachers by professional choice.

As I think back to my days as a student of engineering and the challenges and accomplishments I look back with great fondness and joy and wonder how that time has seemingly passed me by so quickly. We all should enjoy our years as college students as those days define us in the success we seek and the job we perform. I will always have a love for engineering and hope that we find happiness and joy in all we do. I learned from the best, my parents and my teachers.

Automotive Translation

Why do you need Automotive Translation?

Automotive translation involves a lot of technical jargon. It is important that the vehicle translation is accurate because it needs to convey important safety information to the vehicle’s users. Inaccurate translations may have far reaching consequences especially if car users are unable to operate their cars in a safe manner. In addition, many cars are now being assembled in the same country they are being sold in. Therefore, the local assembly plant workers will need accurate translated assembly manuals to aid them in the assembly process.

Companies that frequently employ vehicle translations are manufacturers of cars, trucks, motorcycles, boats, helicopters, aeroplanes, lawn movers, quarry machineries, public works and agriculture handling equipment. Automotive translation will also be able to provide precise translations on mechanical and electronic systems. This would ensure that all the technical terms used in the translation are in accordance to the convention familiar to the local mechanics, engineers, suppliers and customers.

What Types of Documents Require Translation?

As the automotive industry is such a multi-billion business, there are plenty of different materials needing automotive translation. From user manuals to marketing catalogues, they will all need accurate translation. Here is a non-exhaustive list of materials commonly sent for professional automotive translation.

• Technical training manuals

• Repair manuals

• Technical update bulletins

• User manuals

• Catalogues

• Vehicle marketing brochures

• Service manuals

• Diagnosis manuals

• Warranty booklets

• Marketing campaign websites

• Compact disc with car information for customers

• Car owners manuals

• Parts lists

• Car security wiring diagrams

• Technician reference booklets

• Assembly manuals

Who does the Automotive Translation?

A professional translation company will choose only native translators that have experience in engineering, automotive or aero-sciences to do the job. This would ensure that the automotive translations are done only by translators who understand the local automotive industry. It is also common for qualified mechanical engineers to be part-time professional translators.

To begin with, the translation project manager will coordinate with the translators so that standard vocabulary can be established to ensure consistency. During the course of the translation process, a local technical engineer will be hired to carry out regular reviews so that early error detection can be detected, and corrections made quickly. Once the translation project is completed, another professional translator is called in to proofread the translated material. The proofreading ensures that the translated work is accurate and uses uniform technical terms throughout the work before handing it back to the client.

Engine Automotive Friction Problem

1. Engine Automotive Oil Additives or “Snake Oil”? Oil additives have failed to deliver for years.

In August 1992, a brilliantly written article exposed the repeated failures in the claims of the oil additive (engine automotive and trucking) industry. The article was entitled Snake Oil – Is That Additive Really A Negative? It was written by Fred Rau and was originally printed in Road Rider magazine, now Motorcycle Consumer News. That expose provided the basis for what we in the industry knew: oil additives are a means of lifting money from the wallets of uninformed consumers.

Many in the engine automotive industry were already skeptics. We’ve heard all the promises of friction reduction, longer lasting engines, and fuel savings. Repeatedly, such want to be solutions failed to live up to the hype. With over thirty years in the field, I was a full blown skeptic with dozens of oil additives’ experience under my belt.

However, an experienced entrepreneur in the field of “toll blending” for heavy duty industrial solutions drew on his expertise to create an environmentally safe, friction reducing, motor oil additive, solving the one problem oil additives failed to overcome.

Now, if the problem is truly solved, the benefits are obvious:

– less friction means engine automotive protection

– less heat means engine automotive friction is reduced

– longer engine life means a surge in engine automotive performance

– less friction/heat produces a drop in engine automotive related expense

– less friction, heat also leads directly to increased engine automotive fuel economy

Motor oil, as a lubricant, works but is not always sufficient. When it gets hot, motor oil breaks down, vaporizes and burns. The oil industry has been quite innovative, using different additives to combat this process. Motor oil additives consisting of zinc compounds, molybdenum (“moly”), chlorinated paraffins, and others. The problem with all these additives (apart from plugging oil passages and toxicity) is they are only suspended in the oil.

But, you say, that’s the way to get the additives to the hot spots needing friction protection. You must suspend the oil additive in the oil so it is carried to the engine parts needing protection. That’s standard theory.

Yes.

And that’s been the guiding assumption for the oil additive industry all along. Suspend the oil additive in motor oil and let it be carried to the friction hot spots.

2. The “necessary assumption” also provides the problem with engine automotive “theory”.

Repeat: Suspend the oil additive in motor oil and let be carried to the friction hot spots.

So, what’s the problem?

The problem is, the oil additives do not permanently adhere to internal engine stress points. It’s presumed in all oil additive engineering approaches that the motor oil is going to carry its oil additive to the high stress points of the engine. This is where the extra lubricating properties are needed.

In that necessary assumption also lies the problem.

As an engine works under heavy load conditions, pressure and friction build up at some of those metal points. The result? The oil is suddenly “missing in action”. It burns up from excessive heat or is “squeezed out” (exceeds its load bearing capacity) due to excessive pressure.

Either way you end up with “metal on metal”. The additives themselves can’t work because there isn’t enough oil present to suspend them. It’s been squeezed out or burned up. Put bluntly, an additive can only be where the motor oil is present.

Remember, if oil additive engineering is relying on an additive’s suspension in motor oil to do its job, then engineering is also stuck with the limitations of the oil’s properties to withstand heat and pressure.

Note. The additive must be able to withstand heat and pressure to a greater degree than oil or “Why bother adding it?”.

3. Solution: What if an oil additive actually starts to perform at the temperatures and stress where oil normally fails?

The solution was an additive already meeting industrial needs concerning friction and heat build up.

Carried by the motor oil, it comes to friction points…

– engine rings against the cylinder wall

-bearings

-camshafts

-lifters

-valve guides

-turbo charger

-oil pump

Here it does something that no other additive has ever been able to accomplish. This oil additive disassociates (molecularly) from the oil and literally adheres to the metal at the point of friction, leaving a soft metal carboxylate film that can out perform motor oil as a lubricant in a high friction/heat application (as can be seen in the pictures/test results referenced at the site below).

So this lubricant, unlike oil, whether it be synthetic or petroleum, actually starts to perform at the temperatures and stress where oil normally fails. Remember what happens inside the engine, when fuel ignites at the top of the compression stroke and the piston is moving down the cylinder. There, most of the oil on the cylinder wall gets burned up.

But this additive doesn’t burn up like the motor oil carrying it. It molecularly embeds itself into the pores of the cylinder wall. So, when the piston is traveling back up the cylinder, the additive acts as a lubricating agent and is always there.

So, in summation: since you’re getting rid of the friction, then you’re getting rid of the heat generated from it. That means your oil lasts longer. It doesn’t get contaminated as quickly because those high friction points are being adequately lubricated. Adequately lubricated, they will cease to be high friction points, running cooler, the oil will pass through those points without burning which creates harmful acids and sludge.

Most importantly your engine can last longer, run more efficiently, and the fuel that was being used to overcome the friction can now be used to move you down the road to where you need to go.